Fountain Valley News - Your Hometown Community Newspaper

The Story Gets Good

 

December 5, 2018

Last week I left you with Deputy Harry Galbraith bringing three men to the Fountain Jail. He had rounded up the man from Oklahoma and his two sons at their camp out on Sand Creek. He was carrying their rifles and knives, walking behind them as they headed for the Fountain Jail.

The Fountain Jail was not much of a building at the time, basically a board shack, about eight feet square, and one door, no windows. It sat flat on the ground, anchored to several iron stakes driven into the ground. It rarely got used, probably weeks or months before. The surprise was, it was GONE!

The crew was marched up Main Street to Monk’s Hardware Store. Sitting them down next to the stone wall, Harry had a couple men watch them while he called the sheriff’s office in Colorado Springs. It took several hours, but a big car arrived with the sheriff and a deputy. The three were taken to Colorado Springs. Harry and Mr. Riddock went back to recover the Ford. Harry knew nothing about cars, so he needed help. The car was then driven to Colorado Springs. In looking over the camp a few days later, guess what they found?

In the old wagon was a stack of boards, which greatly resembled the boards that were used in building the jail! Harry called the sheriff’s office to report this part of the case. It seems the men had already been released! The Ford was returned, and they had no other charges. When Harry went back to check the camp, the tree and their wagon was already gone, too!

Not long after this a new jail was built. I am not sure, but this may be when the jail that was built out of poured concrete was built. Called a “grout” building, the Fountain jail survived for a long time. This indeed may be why this was done.

Over the years Fountain had a town marshal in addition to a deputy sheriff. Harry did not last long as a peace officer and spent many years as a newspaper feature writer, much like this author. He told this crime story in a newspaper column in 1948.

COBWEB EXPRESS

by Mel McFarland

(1060) The Story Gets Good

Last week I left you with Deputy Harry Galbraith bringing three men to the Fountain Jail. He had rounded up the man from Oklahoma and his two Sons at their camp out on Sand Creek. He was carrying their rifles and knives, walking behind them as they headed for the Fountain Jail.

The Fountain Jail was not much of a building at the time, basically a board shack, about eight feet square, and one door, no windows. It sat flat on the ground, anchored to several iron stakes driven into the ground. It rarely got used, probably weeks or months before. The surprise was, it was GONE!

The crew was marched up Main Street to Monk’s Hardware Store. Sitting them down next to the stone wall, Harry had a couple men watch them while he called the Sheriff’s office in Colorado Springs. it took several hours, but a big car arrived with the Sheriff and a deputy. The three were taken to Colorado Spring. Harry and Mr. Riddock went back to recover the Ford. Harry knew nothing about cars, so he needed help. The car was then driven to Colorado Springs. In looking over the camp a few days later, guess what they found?

In the old wagon was a stack of boards, which greatly resembled the boards that were used in building the jail! Harry called the Sheriff’s Office to report this part of the case. It seems the men had already been released! The Ford was returned, and they had no other charges. When Harry went back to check the camp, the tree and their wagon was already gone, too!

Not long after this a new jail was built. I am not sure, but this may be when the jail that was built out of poured concrete was built. Called a “grout”

building, a Fountain jail survived for a long time. This indeed may be why this was done.

Over the years Fountain had a town Marshal in addition to a Deputy Sheriff. Harry did not last long as a peace officer and spent many years as a newspaper feature writer, much like this author. He told this crime story in a newspaper column in 1948.

 

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